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  1. BEST 2017 NFL KODI LIVE STREAMS (FOOTBALL) Check out the best 2017 NFL Kodi Live Streams for the National Football League season here! Watch NFL 2017 content on Kodi all season long with our easy step-by-step Kodi guide. Stay up to date with the best 2017 NFL Kodi content during this American Football season. No other site will have as in-depth of a 2018 NFL Kodi guide as KodiTips.com. Check out where you can see NFL on Kodi content below! Note:NFL broadcasting coverage is split amongst the three big USA television channels: CBS, NBC, and Fox. The NFL broadcasting coverage is as follows: Thursday Night Football = CBS (first half), NFL Network Sunday afternoon games where the AFC team is away = CBS Sunday afternoon games where the NFC team is away = NBC Sunday Night Football = NBC Monday Night Football = ESPN/TSN (Canada) Thanksgiving Games = NBC NOTE: Some of the add-ons below are geo-blocked and may not work in your country without a VPN. Access all Kodi add-ons Hide your internet connection and streams Works on Android! Tier 1 (no speed slowdown) Note: We don’t host any links or support any content. The Kodi addon below don’t host any links. They are nothing more than search engines that search the public internet. Kodi is nothing more than a media center and stores no content, legal or otherwise. 2017 NFL Kodi Content (National Football League) SportsDevil Live Sports > Atdhenet Live Sports > Dimsports > American Football Live Sports > Firstrowsports > American Football Live Sports > LiveTV > American Football Live Sports > LSHunter > American Football Live Sports > Rojadirecta Live Sports > StopStream > American Football Live Sports > VIPBox > American Football Sports TV > Cricfree.tv Live TV > ibrod.tv Live TV > streamlive Live TV > S2 > United States Live TV > Shadownet Live TV > tvone1 Live TV > zerocast UK Turk Playlists Live TV > Assorted Channels Sports > Assorted Channels Sports > Schedule Picasso Sports Area > Live Games > Live Games List #1 – 3 Sports Area > Sports Channels > Assorted Channels Project M Sports > Live Sports TV > Assorted Channels Sports > Live Sports TV > Live Sports Streams Sports > Live Sports TV > Mama HD Sports.> Live Sports TV > Stream Hunter Sports >.Live Sports TV > Wiz HD Sports Sports > Live Sports TV > Acestreams 1 (Acestream links, VPN recommended) Sports > Live Sports TV > Acestreams 2 (Acestream links, VPN recommended) Sports World Sports Channels > Assorted Channels American Football Section KongTV Sport Section > Assorted Channels Made in Canada Live IPTV > US TV List Sports Central > Live Game Streams Sports Central > Assorted Acestream Sports & Events (Acestream links, VPN recommended) Acestream Channels (Acestream links, VPN recommended) The Delorean Live TV (Beta) > US TV 1 Vortex Special Events Bob Unleashed Bob Sports > Live Sports > Pigskin Bob Sports > :Live Channels > Assorted Channels cCloud Sports Section Ares Football Thank You And Have A Great Day. The Mixdoctor Team Member of koditalk.org
  2. THE U.K. USERS DEFINITELY NEED A VPN! New Premier League Blocking Disrupts Pirate IPTV Providers This weekend the Premier League began a new round of actions targeting illegal streaming. Reports reveal disruption at many IPTV providers, with some indicating that using VPNs is now a must for UK IPTV subscribers. Interestingly, however, sources at some providers claim to have already mitigated the threat. Top tier football in the UK is handled by the English Premier League (EPL) and broadcasting partners Sky and BT Sport. All face considerable problems with Internet piracy, through free web or Kodi-based streaming and premium IPTV feeds. To mitigate the threat, earlier this year the Premier League obtained a unique High Court injunction which required ISPs such as Sky, BT, and Virgin to block ‘pirate’ football streams in real-time. Although the success of the program was initially up for debate, the EPL reported it was able to block 5,000 server IP addresses that were streaming its content. When that temporary injunction ran out, the EPL went back to court for a new one, valid for the season that began this past weekend. There are signs the EPL may have upped its game. As soon as the matches began on Saturday, issues were reported at several of the more prominent IPTV providers. Within minutes of the match streams going live, subscribers to affected services were met with black screens, causing anger and frustration. While some clearly knew that action was on the cards, relatively few had an effective plan in place. One provider, which targets subscribers in the UK, scrambled to obtain new domain names, thinking that the existing domains had been placed on some kind of Premier League blacklist. While that may have indeed been the case, making a service more obscure in that sense was never going to outwit the systems deployed by the anti-piracy outfits involved. Indeed, the provider in question was subjected to much chaos over both Saturday and Sunday, since it’s clear that large numbers of subscribers had absolutely no idea what was going on. Even if they understood that the EPL was blocking, the change of domain flat-footed the rest. The subsequent customer service chaos was not a pretty sight but would’ve been a pleasure for the EPL to behold. An interesting side effect of this EPL action is that even if IPTV subscribers don’t care about football, many were affected this past weekend anyway. TF is aware of at least three services (there are probably many more) that couldn’t service their UK customers with any other channels whatsoever while the Premier League games were being aired. This suggests that the IP addresses hit by the EPL and blocked by local ISPs belonged to the same servers carrying the rest of the content offered by the IPTV providers. When the High Court handed down its original injunction it accepted that some non-Premier League content could be blocked at the same time but since that “consists almost exclusively of [infringing] commercial broadcast content such as other sports, films, and television programs,” there was little concern over collateral damage. So the big question now is what can IPTV providers and/or subscribers do to tackle the threat? The first interesting thing to note is not all of the big providers were affected this past weekend, so for many customers the matches passed by as normal. It isn’t clear whether EPL simply didn’t have all of the providers on the list or whether steps were taken to mitigate the threat, but that was certainly the case in a handful of cases. Information passed to TF shows that at least a small number of providers were not only waiting for the EPL action but actually had a backup plan in place. This appears to have resulted in a minimum of disruption for their customers, something that will prove of interest to the many frustrated subscribers looking for a new service this morning. While the past few days have been somewhat chaotic, other issues have been muddying the waters somewhat. TF has learned that at least two, maybe three suppliers, were subjected to DDoS attacks around the time the matches were due to air. It seems unlikely that the EPL has been given permission to carry out such an attack but since the High Court injunction is secret in every way that describes its anti-piracy methods, that will remain a suspicion. In the meantime, rival IPTV services remain possible suspects. Also, a major IPTV stream ‘wholesaler’ is reported to have had technical issues on Saturday, which affected its ability to serve lower-tier providers. Whether that was also linked to the Premier League action is unknown and TF couldn’t find any source willing to talk about the provider in any detail. So, sports fans who rely on IPTV for their fix are wondering how things will pan out later this week. If this last weekend is anything to go by, disruption is guaranteed, but it will be less of a surprise given the problems of the last few days. While some don’t foresee huge problems, several providers are already advising customers that VPNs will be necessary. An IPTV provider suggesting the use of VPNs While a VPN will indeed solve the problem in most cases, for many subscribers that will amount to an additional expense, not to mention more time spent learning about VPNs, what they can do, and how they can be setup on the hardware they’re using for IPTV. For users on Android devices running IPTV apps or Kodi-type setups, VPNs are both easy to install and use. However, Mag Box STB users cannot run a VPN directly on the device, meaning that they’ll need either a home router that can run a VPN or a smaller ‘travel’ type router with OpenVPN capabilities to use as a go-between. Either way, costs are beginning to creep up, if IPTV providers can’t deal with the EPL’s blocking efforts. That makes the new cheaper football packages offered by various providers that little bit more attractive. But that was probably the plan all along. Thank You And Have A Great Day. The Mixdoctor Team Member of koditalk.org
  3. Sky: People Can’t Pirate Live Soccer in the UK Anymore, BUT MIXDOCTOR SAYS YOU CAN VIA A VPN OR IPTV SUBSCRIPTION Sky’s head of litigation made a rather surprising statement at an industry convention in Macau this week. Matthew Hibbert told those in attendance that thanks to site-blocking, it’s no longer possible to watch pirated live soccer in the UK anymore. Meanwhile, the UK Intellectual Property Office has revealed that when questioned a while back, rightsholders told them that pirate boxes weren’t a problem. How things change. The commotion over the set-top box streaming phenomenon is showing no signs of dying down and if day one at the Cable and Satellite Broadcasting Association of Asia (CASBAA) Conference 2017 was anything to go by, things are only heating up. Held at Studio City in Macau, the conference has a strong anti-piracy element and was opened by Joe Welch, CASBAA Board Chairman and SVP Public Affairs Asia, 21st Century Fox. He began Tuesday by noting the important recent launch of a brand new anti-piracy initiative. “CASBAA recently launched the Coalition Against Piracy, funded by 18 of the region’s content players and distribution partners,” he said. TF reported on the formation of the coalition mid-October. It includes heavyweights such as Disney, Fox, HBO, NBCUniversal and BBC Worldwide, and will have a strong focus on the illicit set-top box market. Illegal streaming devices (or ISDs, as the industry calls them), were directly addressed in a segment yesterday afternoon titled Face To Face. Led by Dr. Ros Lynch, Director of Copyright & IP Enforcement at the UK Intellectual Property Office, the session detailed the “onslaught of online piracy” and the rise of ISDs that is apparently “shaking the market”. Given the apparent gravity of those statements, the following will probably come as a surprise. According to Lynch, the UK IPO sought the opinion of UK-based rightsholders about the pirate box phenomenon a while back after being informed of their popularity in the East. The response was that pirate boxes weren’t an issue. It didn’t take long, however, for things to blow up. “The UKIPO provides intelligence and evidence to industry and the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) in London who then take enforcement actions,” Lynch explained. “We first heard about the issues with ISDs from [broadcaster] TVB in Hong Kong and we then consulted the UK rights holders who responded that it wasn’t a problem. Two years later the issue just exploded.” The evidence of that in the UK isn’t difficult to find. In addition to millions of devices with both free Kodi addon and subscription-based systems deployed, the app market has bloomed too, offering free or near to free content to all. This caught the eye of the Premier League who this year obtained two pioneering injunctions (1,2) to tackle live streams of football games. Streams are blocked by local ISPs in real-time, making illicit online viewing a more painful experience than it ever has been. No doubt progress has been made on this front, with thousands of streams blocked, but according to broadcaster Sky, the results are unprecedented. “Site-blocking has moved the goalposts significantly,” said Matthew Hibbert, head of litigation at Sky UK. “In the UK you cannot watch pirated live Premier League content anymore,” he said. While progress has been good, the statement is overly enthusiastic. TF sources have been monitoring the availability of pirate streams on around dozen illicit sites and services every Saturday (when it is actually illegal to broadcast matches in the UK) and service has been steady on around half of them and intermittent at worst on the rest. There are hundreds of other platforms available so while many are definitely affected by Premier League blocking, it’s safe to assume that live football piracy hasn’t been wiped out. Nevertheless, it would be wrong to suggest that no progress has been made, in this and other related areas. Kevin Plumb, Director of Legal Services at The Premier League, said that pubs showing football from illegal streams had also massively dwindled in numbers. “In the past 18 months the illegal broadcasting of live Premier League matches in pubs in the UK has been decimated,” he said. This result is almost certainly down to prosecutions taken in tandem with the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT), that have seen several landlords landed with large fines. Indeed, both sides of the market have been tackled, with both licensed premises and IPTV device sellers being targeted. “The most successful thing we’ve done to combat piracy has been to undertake criminal prosecutions against ISD piracy,” said FACT chief Kieron Sharp yesterday. “Everyone is pleading guilty to these offenses.” Most if not all of FACT-led prosecutions target device and subscription sellers under fraud legislation but that could change in the future, Lynch of the Intellectual Property Office said. “While the UK works to update its legislation, we can’t wait for the new legislation to take enforcement actions and we rely heavily on ‘conspiracy to defraud’ charges, and have successfully prosecuted a number of ISD retailers,” she said. Finally, information provided yesterday by network company CISCO shine light on what it costs to run a subscription-based pirate IPTV operation. Director of Intelligence & Security Operations Avigail Gutman said a pirate IPTV server offering 1,000 channels to around 1,000 subscribers can cost as little as 2,000 euros per month to run but can generate 12,000 euros in revenue during the same period. “In April of 2017, ten major paid TV and content providers had relinquished 3.09 million euros per month to 285 ISD-based streaming pirate syndicates,” she said. There’s little doubt that IPTV piracy, both paid and free, is here to stay. The big question is how it will be tackled short and long-term and whether any changes in legislation will have any unintended knock-on effects. Update November 9: CASBAA has been in touch with TorrentFreak with an amendment to Matt Hibbert’s comments. Rather than the quote provided by the organization previously, Hibbert is now reported as saying the following: “In the UK you cannot easily now watch live Premier League content. It (the site blocking order) drives piracy back to the margins.” That certainly makes more sense, given the situation on the ground. Thank You And Have A Great Day
  4. Could this be the end of Kodi? Premier League chiefs are currently deciding whether to provide live streams of games in an attempt to quash illegal viewing. As of next season, Football League matches will be available online to fans outside of the UK and Ireland. Those who subscribe to iFollow – a digital live streaming and content platform – will pay the equivalent of £110 a season for Championship, League One and League Two coverage. Over 1,500 of these matches will be available in HD quality. Supporters based in the UK and Ireland will still be able to access live audio commentary, highlights packages and exclusive content as part of the new offering, which has been re-branded to replace the EFL’s current PlayerHD platform. And Premier League bosses are now considering whether to make the move into steaming matches online. Around 30% of football fans watch games illegally, many via online sources or through Kodi box add-ons. By embracing online streaming, the Premier League will be offering a new way to watch the sport online without the worry of prosecution. But football chiefs are likely to be reluctant to do anything that will risk reducing the massive £8.2 billion broadcasters paid to air matches between 2016 and 2019. With rights fees for matches skyrocketing and viewing figures for sports broadcasters falling steadily, the organisation is aware that offering a live streaming service could help the imbalance, according to Digiday . Last season saw the biggest drop in live Premier League TV viewing figures for seven years, with both Sky and BT affected. Sky saw a 14 per cent fall in viewing numbers, while BT channels dropped by two per cent. Thank You And Have A Great Day. The Mixdoctor Team Member of koditalk.org
  5. LOOKS LIKE ALL MY IPTV PROVIDERS FRIENDS ARE WINNING IPTV Providers Counter Premier League Piracy Blocks The Premier League and its anti-piracy partners have begun blocking some illicit IPTV streams in the UK after obtaining a High Court injunction earlier this year. However, providers are already countering the efforts in various ways, including tweaks to their Kodi addons. In the UK, top tier football is handled by The Premier League and its broadcasting partners Sky and BT Sport. All are facing problems with Internet piracy. In a nutshell, official subscriptions are far from cheap, so people are always on the lookout for more affordable alternatives. As a result, large numbers of fans are turning to piracy-enabled set-top boxes for their fix. These devices, often running Kodi with third-party addons, not only provide free or cheap football streams but also enable fans to watch matches at 3pm on Saturdays, a time traditionally covered by the blackout. To mitigate this threat, earlier this year the Premier League obtained a rather special High Court injunction. While similar in its aims to earlier orders targeting torrent sites including The Pirate Bay, this injunction enables the Premier League to act quickly, forcing local ISPs such as Sky, BT, and Virgin to block football streams in real-time. “This will enable us to target the suppliers of illegal streams to IPTV boxes, and the internet, in a proportionate and precise manner,” the Premier League said at the time. Ever since the injunction was issued, TF has monitored for signs that it has been achieving its stated aim of stopping or at least reducing stream availability. Based on information obtained from several popular IPTV suppliers, after several weeks we have concluded that Premier League streams are still easy to find, with some conditions. HD sources for games across all Sky channels are commonplace on paid services, with SD sources available for free. High-quality streams have been consistently available on Saturday afternoons for the sensitive 3pm kick-off, with little to no interference or signs of disruption. Of course, the Internet is a very big place, so it is certainly possible that disruption has been experienced by users elsewhere. However, what we do know is that some IPTV providers have been working behind the scenes to keep their services going. According to a low-level contact at one IPTV provider who demanded total anonymity, servers used by his ‘company’ (he uses the term loosely) have seen their loads drop unexpectedly during match times, an indication that ISPs might be targeting their customers with blocks. A re-seller for another well-known provider told TF that some intermittent disruption had been felt but that it was “being handled” as and when it “becomes a problem.” Complaint levels from customers are not yet considered a concern, he added. That the Premier League’s efforts are having at least some effect doesn’t appear to be in doubt, but it’s pretty difficult to find evidence in public. That being said, an IPTV provider whose identity we were asked to conceal has taken more easily spotted measures. After Premier League matches got underway this past Tuesday night, the provider in question launched a new beta service in its Kodi addon. Perhaps unsurprisingly, it allows users to cycle through proxy servers in order to bypass blocks put in place by ISPs on behalf of the Premier League. Embedded proxy service in Kodi As seen from the image above, the beta unblocking service is accessible via the service’s Kodi addon and requires no special skills to operate. Simply clicking on the “Find a Proxy to Use” menu item opens up the page below. The servers used to bypass the blocks Once a working proxy is found, access to the streams is facilitated indirectly, thereby evading the Premier League’s attempts at blocking IP addresses at the UK’s ISPs. Once that’s achieved, the list of streams is accessible again. Sky Sports streams ready, in HD The use of proxies for this kind of traffic is of interest, at least as far as the injunction goes. What we know already is that the Premier League only has permission to block servers if it “reasonably believes” they have the “sole or predominant purpose of enabling or facilitating access to infringing streams of Premier League match footage.” If any server “is being used for any other substantial purpose”, the football organization cannot block it, meaning that non-dedicated or multi-function proxies cannot be blocked by ISPs, legally at least. On Thursday evening, however, a TF source monitoring a popular IPTV provider using proxies reported that the match between Southampton and Manchester United suddenly became blocked. Whether that was due to Premier League action is unclear but by using a VPN, usual service was restored. The use of VPNs with IPTV services raises other issues, however. All Premier League blockades can be circumvented with the use of a VPN but many IPTV providers are known for being intolerant of them, since they can also be used by restreamers to ‘pirate’ their service. The Premier League injunction came into force on March 18, 2017, and will run out this weekend when the football season ends. It’s reasonable to presume that the period will have been used for testing and that the Premier League will be back in court again this year seeking a further injunction for the new season starting in August. Expect it to be more effective than it has been thus far. Thank You ? And Have A Great Day. The Mixdoctor Team Member of koditalk.org
  6. REALLY BAD NEWS FOR UK FOOTBALL/SPORTS FANS WITH KODI The new piracy blocking injunction obtained by the UK’s Premier League is groundbreaking on several levels, court papers have revealed. Not only did the football outfit work closely with Sky, BT and Virgin (who all have a vested interest) but the ISPs also monitored traffic from ‘pirate’ servers requested by their customers. Live blocking of streams will be possible too, with no immediate court oversight. Last week, The Premier League obtained a new High Court injunction that will enable it to block streams delivered to the public via Kodi and similar devices. The details made available at the time suggested this injunction was something new, beyond the scope of earlier site-blocking orders. After obtaining and digesting a copy of the injunction yesterday, we can now report that this is something very special indeed. Not least, it provides a unique view into a future where ISPs are not only Internet gateways but also content providers with a vested interest in what their subscribers can view online. In broad terms, The Premier League wants to stop the public from watching unauthorized live streams of their matches online, many of them through Kodi and similar tools. However, since these are by definition live, they need to be able to react quickly to shut them down. It’s a unique problem that has found a unique solution. The ‘defendants’ in the case (and we use the term extremely loosely) are the UK’s leading ISPs – Sky, BT, Virgin Media, Plusnet, EE and TalkTalk – all of which are suppliers of Premier League content to the public. It is crystal clear that the ISPs had a vested interest in this injunction being granted. “All of the Defendants have been involved in negotiations over the terms of the Order, with the result that the wording of the Order was agreed,” the injunctionreads. As detailed in our earlier report, rather than targeting websites, this injunction targets the servers streaming the content. As a result, this case involves the blocking of IP addresses of streaming servers, most of which are located overseas. “A timely response is important in the case of Premier League matches because, to be effective, any intervention must occur during the course of a match. The operators of streaming servers regularly change the IP addresses from which the servers operate,” the High Court notes. Before presenting its evidence to the High Court, the Premier League (FAPL) hired an unnamed anti-piracy company to monitor infringing streams for a number of weeks. During this process, it identified “a large number” of IP addresses from where infringing content was made available. From here, the FAPL identified a subset of streaming servers it now wants to be blocked. It used three criteria to select them but the Court has chosen to keep those details a secret, “because if they were made public it would make it easier for the Order to be circumvented.” What we do know is these servers can only be selected by FAPL if it “reasonably believes” they have the “sole or predominant purpose of enabling or facilitating access to infringing streams of Premier League match footage.” Secondly, the FAPL must not know or have reason to believe “that the server is being used for any other substantial purpose.” This caution is needed because this injunction will be carried out live, as soon as matches begin to hit the Internet. FAPL and its anti-piracy contractor will monitor the Internet, grab IP addresses, and ask the ISPs to block them in real-time. No court will be involved in that process, it will be carried out at the discretion of the FAPL and the ISPs. And of course, this is where things get a little bit unusual. While ISPs like BT, Sky, and Virgin Media are defendants in the case, it’s notable in the injunction that the Court speaks about their rights as broadcasters being infringed. That they have a vested interest and have been working with FAPL is even more evident when one reads about some of the information they appear to have been sharing. In discussing the merits of the case, the High Court asks whether copyrighted content has been distributed to the public in the UK, raising several points of fact in support. One in particular raises eyebrows. “A very substantial volume of traffic from BT, Sky and Virgin, who are the three largest UK ISPs, has been recorded from these [infringing servers] during Premier League match times,” the injunction reads. “The extent of these spikes in traffic, the closeness of their correlation with each scheduled match, and the absolute volume in terms of raw bandwidth consumed, are only consistent with large numbers of consumers obtaining Premier League content from these servers.” The above is framed as if the ISPs have only monitored incoming server traffic, but someone has to request that data and the ISPs clearly know which customers are doing that. After all, they’re making the connections. Given the text, it seems reasonable to conclude that the ISPs, one way or another, are monitoring which servers their customers are accessing. “The traffic spikes are sustained throughout the period of each Premier League match. By and large, the bandwidth (and therefore interest) lasts for precisely the same period as the match, with an immediate drop-off thereafter,” the High Court notes. “Deliberate consumer activity of this kind [emphasis ours] is strongly indicative of the fact that a substantial proportion of the relevant UK public regards the Premier League content on these servers as directed to and meant for them.” The Court further underlines with the following: “The [ISPs] have actual knowledge of the infringing use of their services as a result of detailed pre-application correspondence, monitoring some of the Defendants have themselves carried out, notices sent by the Premier League, and more recently service of the application and accompanying evidence.” In granting the injunction, the High Court considered whether doing so would negatively affect the ISPs’ ability to do business. It needn’t have worried. “Five of the Defendants [TalkTalk only agreed not to oppose] positively support the making of the Order. [This] is strong evidence that it will not impair their freedom to carry on business,” the injunction notes, adding that no ISP made an application for costs. Of note is the short duration of the injunction. It comes into force on March 18, 2017 and lasts until May 22, 2017, when the football season ends. This short term is intended as a trial period of sorts. If all works out, the FAPL will apply for a new injunction that will cover the 2017/2018 season. Overall, this injunction provides a clear indication of what can happen when ISPs stop being “mere conduits” of information and start becoming distributors of entertainment content. In the case of Sky and BT, who pay billions for content, it would be perhaps naive to think that they would’ve behaved in any other way. Indeed, this case has all the hallmarks of companies agreeing to take action together and then going through the formalities of an injunction application to get the necessary rubber stamp and avoid criticism. Whether the latter will still be achieved is open to debate CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL BY CLICKING HERE ?The Mixdoctor ? Team Member of forum.place & Extreme Kodi Testing ( Check us out too ) You Can Now Follow Me On Twitter https://twitter.com/Kodi_Mixdoctor CHECK OUT OUR LATEST SITE Stream Help http://streamhelp.org If We Or This Forum Has Helped You Please Consider Donating To Keep All Videos And Forums Up To Date And Active As The Server Costs Are Great Remember Click Around The Adverts As This Also Helps Pay For Server Costs Thank You And Have A Great Day ? KODI DISCLAIMER We are not connected to or in any other way affiliated with Kodi, Team Kodi, or the XBMC Foundation. The 3rd Party addons are not the property of Kodi.tv and not supported by them. Third party addons will not receive any support in official Kodi channels, including the Kodi forums and various social networks
  7. New UK ‘Kodi’ Piracy Blocking Injunction is a Pretty Scary Beast Just click on the picture below and PLEASE click some of our adverts on the site to help server costs, ❤️ thank you so much ❤️? CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL BY CLICKING HERE ?The Mixdoctor ? Team Member of forum.place & Extreme Kodi Testing ( Check us out too ) You Can Now Follow Me On Twitter https://twitter.com/Kodi_Mixdoctor CHECK OUT OUR LATEST SITE Stream Help http://streamhelp.org If We Or This Forum Has Helped You Please Consider Donating To Keep All Videos And Forums Up To Date And Active As The Server Costs Are Great Remember Click Around The Adverts As This Also Helps Pay For Server Costs Thank You And Have A Great Day ? KODI DISCLAIMER We are not connected to or in any other way affiliated with Kodi, Team Kodi, or the XBMC Foundation. The 3rd Party addons are not the property of Kodi.tv and not supported by them. Third party addons will not receive any support in official Kodi channels, including the Kodi forums and various social networks
  8. REALLY BAD NEWS FOR UK FOOTBALL/SPORTS FANS WITH KODI The new piracy blocking injunction obtained by the UK’s Premier League is groundbreaking on several levels, court papers have revealed. Not only did the football outfit work closely with Sky, BT and Virgin (who all have a vested interest) but the ISPs also monitored traffic from ‘pirate’ servers requested by their customers. Live blocking of streams will be possible too, with no immediate court oversight. Last week, The Premier League obtained a new High Court injunction that will enable it to block streams delivered to the public via Kodi and similar devices. The details made available at the time suggested this injunction was something new, beyond the scope of earlier site-blocking orders. After obtaining and digesting a copy of the injunction yesterday, we can now report that this is something very special indeed. Not least, it provides a unique view into a future where ISPs are not only Internet gateways but also content providers with a vested interest in what their subscribers can view online. In broad terms, The Premier League wants to stop the public from watching unauthorized live streams of their matches online, many of them through Kodi and similar tools. However, since these are by definition live, they need to be able to react quickly to shut them down. It’s a unique problem that has found a unique solution. The ‘defendants’ in the case (and we use the term extremely loosely) are the UK’s leading ISPs – Sky, BT, Virgin Media, Plusnet, EE and TalkTalk – all of which are suppliers of Premier League content to the public. It is crystal clear that the ISPs had a vested interest in this injunction being granted. “All of the Defendants have been involved in negotiations over the terms of the Order, with the result that the wording of the Order was agreed,” the injunctionreads. As detailed in our earlier report, rather than targeting websites, this injunction targets the servers streaming the content. As a result, this case involves the blocking of IP addresses of streaming servers, most of which are located overseas. “A timely response is important in the case of Premier League matches because, to be effective, any intervention must occur during the course of a match. The operators of streaming servers regularly change the IP addresses from which the servers operate,” the High Court notes. Before presenting its evidence to the High Court, the Premier League (FAPL) hired an unnamed anti-piracy company to monitor infringing streams for a number of weeks. During this process, it identified “a large number” of IP addresses from where infringing content was made available. From here, the FAPL identified a subset of streaming servers it now wants to be blocked. It used three criteria to select them but the Court has chosen to keep those details a secret, “because if they were made public it would make it easier for the Order to be circumvented.” What we do know is these servers can only be selected by FAPL if it “reasonably believes” they have the “sole or predominant purpose of enabling or facilitating access to infringing streams of Premier League match footage.” Secondly, the FAPL must not know or have reason to believe “that the server is being used for any other substantial purpose.” This caution is needed because this injunction will be carried out live, as soon as matches begin to hit the Internet. FAPL and its anti-piracy contractor will monitor the Internet, grab IP addresses, and ask the ISPs to block them in real-time. No court will be involved in that process, it will be carried out at the discretion of the FAPL and the ISPs. And of course, this is where things get a little bit unusual. While ISPs like BT, Sky, and Virgin Media are defendants in the case, it’s notable in the injunction that the Court speaks about their rights as broadcasters being infringed. That they have a vested interest and have been working with FAPL is even more evident when one reads about some of the information they appear to have been sharing. In discussing the merits of the case, the High Court asks whether copyrighted content has been distributed to the public in the UK, raising several points of fact in support. One in particular raises eyebrows. “A very substantial volume of traffic from BT, Sky and Virgin, who are the three largest UK ISPs, has been recorded from these [infringing servers] during Premier League match times,” the injunction reads. “The extent of these spikes in traffic, the closeness of their correlation with each scheduled match, and the absolute volume in terms of raw bandwidth consumed, are only consistent with large numbers of consumers obtaining Premier League content from these servers.” The above is framed as if the ISPs have only monitored incoming server traffic, but someone has to request that data and the ISPs clearly know which customers are doing that. After all, they’re making the connections. Given the text, it seems reasonable to conclude that the ISPs, one way or another, are monitoring which servers their customers are accessing. “The traffic spikes are sustained throughout the period of each Premier League match. By and large, the bandwidth (and therefore interest) lasts for precisely the same period as the match, with an immediate drop-off thereafter,” the High Court notes. “Deliberate consumer activity of this kind [emphasis ours] is strongly indicative of the fact that a substantial proportion of the relevant UK public regards the Premier League content on these servers as directed to and meant for them.” The Court further underlines with the following: “The [ISPs] have actual knowledge of the infringing use of their services as a result of detailed pre-application correspondence, monitoring some of the Defendants have themselves carried out, notices sent by the Premier League, and more recently service of the application and accompanying evidence.” In granting the injunction, the High Court considered whether doing so would negatively affect the ISPs’ ability to do business. It needn’t have worried. “Five of the Defendants [TalkTalk only agreed not to oppose] positively support the making of the Order. [This] is strong evidence that it will not impair their freedom to carry on business,” the injunction notes, adding that no ISP made an application for costs. Of note is the short duration of the injunction. It comes into force on March 18, 2017 and lasts until May 22, 2017, when the football season ends. This short term is intended as a trial period of sorts. If all works out, the FAPL will apply for a new injunction that will cover the 2017/2018 season. Overall, this injunction provides a clear indication of what can happen when ISPs stop being “mere conduits” of information and start becoming distributors of entertainment content. In the case of Sky and BT, who pay billions for content, it would be perhaps naive to think that they would’ve behaved in any other way. Indeed, this case has all the hallmarks of companies agreeing to take action together and then going through the formalities of an injunction application to get the necessary rubber stamp and avoid criticism. Whether the latter will still be achieved is open to debate CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL BY CLICKING HERE ?The Mixdoctor ? Team Member of forum.place & Extreme Kodi Testing ( Check us out too ) You Can Now Follow Me On Twitter https://twitter.com/Kodi_Mixdoctor CHECK OUT OUR LATEST SITE Stream Help http://streamhelp.org If We Or This Forum Has Helped You Please Consider Donating To Keep All Videos And Forums Up To Date And Active As The Server Costs Are Great Remember Click Around The Adverts As This Also Helps Pay For Server Costs Thank You And Have A Great Day ? KODI DISCLAIMER We are not connected to or in any other way affiliated with Kodi, Team Kodi, or the XBMC Foundation. The 3rd Party addons are not the property of Kodi.tv and not supported by them. Third party addons will not receive any support in official Kodi channels, including the Kodi forums and various social networks
  9. New UK ‘Kodi’ Piracy Blocking Injunction is a Pretty Scary Beast Just click on the picture below and PLEASE click some of our adverts on the site to help server costs, ❤️ thank you so much ❤️? CHECK OUT OUR NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL BY CLICKING HERE ?The Mixdoctor ? Team Member of forum.place & Extreme Kodi Testing ( Check us out too ) You Can Now Follow Me On Twitter https://twitter.com/Kodi_Mixdoctor CHECK OUT OUR LATEST SITE Stream Help http://streamhelp.org If We Or This Forum Has Helped You Please Consider Donating To Keep All Videos And Forums Up To Date And Active As The Server Costs Are Great Remember Click Around The Adverts As This Also Helps Pay For Server Costs Thank You And Have A Great Day ? KODI DISCLAIMER We are not connected to or in any other way affiliated with Kodi, Team Kodi, or the XBMC Foundation. The 3rd Party addons are not the property of Kodi.tv and not supported by them. Third party addons will not receive any support in official Kodi channels, including the Kodi forums and various social networks
  10. Owusu84

    Sports - PLP stream

    The link for PLP stream has gone missing since the latest update, can anyone recommend the next best thing?? Thanks O